Category Archives: Sides

One thing I love about my CSA

Stir fry of onion, Bok choy, radishes.
Stir fry of onion, Bok choy, radishes.

I love having a box of fresh veggies, many things that I don’t ordinarily get, then trying things out with them. Sometimes combinations surprise me! – like this Stir Fry of chopped onion, Bok choy stems, salad radishes (that’s the Julienne veggie) and Bok choy greens, added last. Add a bit of salt, a few drops of soy sauce if you wish, and oh, my, was it good!

Here’s a note about how I stir fry: I cut all the veggies first. I heat some extra virgin olive oil in a wok and often throw in a little minced garlic first. This time, I don’t believe I did. Then I add the onions, sauteeing until soft. Then I add the remaining “hard” veggies, most “hard” first, sauteeing for a few moments after each — reserving any greens. When the veggies start to brown a bit, I add a little salt and soy sauce, stir and cover if needed to steam the veggies for a couple of minutes.  Uncover and add the greens, stir together and sauté briefly until the greens are wilted, adjust seasoning, and serve.

I also made Fatoush with what I had on hand instead of the usual, and it, too, was delicious with a creamy vegan dressing:

FATOUSH

Ingredients

  • Mixed greens, any you have on hand or like. Bok choy and Butterhead Lettuce featured heavily in this one.
  • Garlic scapes
  • Green onion
  • Red cabbage (I usually use it but don’t see it here – must have forgotten)
  • Tomatoes – organic grape tomatoes, quartered
  • Radishes – organic, Julienne
  • Cucumbers – organic, sliced and quartered or Julienne
  • Pita – Whole wheat Lebanese pita, cut into squares and toasted
  • Sumac  to sprinkle

Ingredients for Sauce

  • Mayonnaise, 1 cup (I use Hampton Creek Just Mayo – vegan)
  • Tahina, 1/4 cup
  • Garlic, 1/2 – 1 clove mashed (opt.)
  • Salt, 1-2 tsp. (start with 1 tsp. for dressing, add additional to salad after mixed)
  • Hot paprika, 1/4 tsp.
  • Lemon, freshly squeezed, 1/4-1/2 cup, to taste (start with 1/4 cup for dressing, add additional to salad after mixed)

Procedure

  1. Prepare salad ingredients: slice greens 1/8-1/4″, then cut across into 2-3″ pieces. Quarter grape tomatoes or petite dice plum tomatoes. Julienne cucumbers and radishes.
  2. Stack the pita pieces, cut through them lattice-work style so you end up with 1-2″ squares, roast in a 200 degree oven until crunchy, cool thoroughly and set aside or bag for later use. I like to use whole wheat Lebanese pita, available through a local Arab bakery. Lebanese pita is larger than pocket pita and thinner. Makes a great “crouton.” Stored properly, they keep for a long time once toasted and thoroughly dry.
  3. Make the dressing. For a vegan salad, use a vegan mayo. Your dressing should taste salty and lemony because by the time you add it to the salad with its moisture, it will lose some potency. I start a bit lighter on the seasoning, then add the remainder if needed when the salad is made up. You don’t need to use all the dressing at once — if you have leftover, just store in a covered jar.
  4. Put all salad ingredients into a bowl. Add toasted pita so you have 2 parts salad to 1 part pita. Add some dressing and a pinch or two of sumac (available in Middle Eastern stores and online), and mix gently but completely. Add more or less dressing to your liking.
  5. Sprinkle additional sumac over the salad and serve.

If you’d like more information about the CSA, please visit Bob’s Fresh and Local (produce) and All Grass Farms (livestock, chickens, milk and cheese).

For more, visit my blog, vegetatingwithleslie.org, “Like” me on FaceBook/Vegetating with Leslie or follow me on Twitter, @vegwithleslie.

A few dishes I made with my CSA veggies

These are some things I made during the last week with the veggies from my CSA, sometimes a few additional things. I don’t always note quantities…they’re kind of simple, pinch and toss type dishes.

Stir-fry with Bok choy, green beans, red bell pepper, mushrooms, garlic, lots of onion, fresh ginger root, salt and a bit of soy sauce.
Stir-fry with Bok choy, green beans, red bell pepper, mushrooms, garlic, lots of onion, fresh ginger root, salt and a bit of soy sauce.
Fast food on a night I didn't feel like cooking - edamame pasta with marinara, Bok choy , onions.
Fast food on a night I didn’t feel like cooking – edamame pasta with marinara, Bok choy , green onions.
Miso Soup - 1 TB miso and 1/2 tsp. soy sauce to 1.5 cups water (I think I made a soup of about 6 cups). I sauteed onion and Bok choy stems first, then prepared the liquid/soup in the same pot. When it was hot, I added cut up Bok choy leaves and tofu squares. Checked the seasoning, added a little pepper and topped it off with green onions.
Miso Soup – 1 TB miso and 1/2 tsp. soy sauce to 1.5 cups water (I think I made a soup of about 6 cups). I sautéed onion and Bok choy stems first, then prepared the liquid/soup in the same pot. When it was hot, I added cut up Bok choy leaves and tofu squares. Checked the seasoning, added a little pepper and topped it off with green onions.
Corn and potato chowder. Saute chopped onion in extra virgin olive oil, add some cut up carrots. When soft, add lots of cut up potato and organic corn. Cut up greens come in at the end when finished cooking. I think I might have used kale or maybe a mix of kale and Bok choy for this, but any tender greens are fine. It was simply seasoned with salt and pepper, and I happened to have some fresh marjoram as well.
Corn and potato chowder. Saute chopped onion in extra virgin olive oil, add some cut up carrots. When soft, add lots of cut up potato and organic corn. Cut up greens come in at the end when finished cooking. I think I might have used kale or maybe a mix of kale and Bok choy for this, but any tender greens are fine. It was simply seasoned with salt and pepper, and I happened to have some fresh marjoram as well.
Lots of delicious sauteed onions and Bok choy stems, sauteed tofu squares, Bok choy greens at the last minute and a bit of soy sauce. Mmmm...mmm...good!
Lots of delicious sautéed onions and Bok choy stems, sautéed tofu squares, Bok choy greens at the last-minute and a bit of soy sauce. Mmmm…mmm…good!
As usual, I sauteed lots of chopped onion in some extra virgin olive oil, added a bit of carrot, then 1 cup of red lentils and 6 cups of water, 2 tsp. salt, 1 tsp. cumin, 1 tsp. cumin, 1 tsp. curry...pan roasted some cauliflower and added it when the lentils were done, then collard greens at the very last moment. Topped it with some garlic "sprouts" (I forget what you call them).
As usual, I sautéed lots of chopped onion in some extra virgin olive oil, added a bit of carrot, then 1 cup of red lentils and 6 cups of water, 2 tsp. salt, 1 tsp. cumin, 1 tsp. cumin, 1 tsp. curry…pan roasted some cauliflower and added it when the lentils were done, then collard greens at the very last moment. Topped it with some garlic “scapes.”

If you’d like more information about the CSA, please visit Bob’s Fresh and Local (produce) and All Grass Farms (livestock, chickens, milk and cheese).

For more, visit my blog, vegetatingwithleslie.org, “Like” me on FaceBook/Vegetating with Leslie or follow me on Twitter, @vegwithleslie.

Practising for summer: Pickles!

pickles05_sm

Fermented foods: enjoy some every day

Many of you are probably getting underway with your summer gardening plans. Be sure your plan includes things you can pickle!

Fermented foods are great for you. And there’s one quick and easy way to make certain you have some delicious fermented products with every meal: pickles.

Pickles and olives are part of every meal in the Middle East. When they’re this easy to make, why would you ever get canned? Better yet, when you make your own, you can season them exactly as you’d like.

For the batch of pickles you see pictured here, I used Persian cucumbers, the small, thin, denser variety I can often find in my neighborhood. Regular pickles will work just as well. In fact, you can pickle almost any firm veggies in this way.

A couple of my favorites are cauliflower with red cabbage – or turnips with a beet. Sometimes I throw carrots in with my regular pickles for the color, and the carrots pickle nicely as well. Pieces of red bell pepper or colorful whole mini-peppers work the same way.

One more word about the pickles you see in the picture: I love spicy things. Not everyone does in my world. That’s why I made two jars of pickles to have in the ‘fridge: one has hot peppers in it and the other doesn’t.

For the hot peppers, habanero work perfectly to spice up the whole batch. Unfortunately I couldn’t find any so am trying red “finger hot” peppers. They weren’t hot enough for me last time, but I thought I might give them another chance.

I can't wait 'til these are ready! I've got my ingredients together (except the garlic) and am ready to go.
I can’t wait ’til these are ready! I’ve got my ingredients together (except the garlic, vinegar and salt) and am ready to go.

PICKLES

Ingredients

  • Pickles, 8-10 large, green & firm Persian pickles (or any other firm veggie in about the same amount)
  • Garlic, lots – about 8-10 large cloves
  • Dill, lots – a good-sized bunch
  • Hot pepper/s – to taste (I prefer habanero and would use 2 or 3 for this size batch)

BRINE

  • Water, 4 cups
  • Vinegar, 1 cup
  • Kosher salt, 3 TB

Directions

  1. Use clear, clean glass containers for your pickles. I prefer a glass lid as well so I can re-use it. The metals lids require too much care. Be sure your containers have a wide mouth.
  2. The glass container I used for these pickles was a 2 quart container. That means you might need a recipe and a half of the brine per two quart container.
  3. Clean all veggies — those you are pickling as well as the dill and peppers.
  4. Put plenty of fresh dill in the bottom of the container along with garlic slices. Add veggies, layering if appropriate, fitting in more dill and garlic slices wherever you can.
  5. Top off with more dill and garlic.
  6. Pour brine over the contents in the jar until it reaches the top of the jar. Be certain everything is completely submerged.
  7. Close the lid and place in the refrigerator for at least two weeks.
  8. These pickles will keep in the refrigerator for 3-4 months. I have had them as long as six months. They still seemed fine, but I thought it best to make a new batch. Usually they don’t last more than a couple of weeks in my house.

For more, visit my blog, vegetatingwithleslie.org, “Like” me on FaceBook/Vegetating with Leslie or follow me on Twitter, @vegwithleslie.